Logi Family Overview - In Depth

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LOGi FPGA Family of Development Boards Overview

 

Bringing FPGA integration to widely used embedded platforms in a plug and play manner







 

Revision 1.0

May 2013

Author: Michael Jones

Mjones@valentfx.com














 

LOGi FPGA Family of Development Boards Overview

Contents

LOGi FPGA Family of Development Boards Overview and Distribution Proposal    

LOGi Family Key Attributes    

1) Valent F(x), LLC and Michael Jones, Creator of the LOGi Family    

2) Overview of the FPGA LOGi Family Attributes and Key features    

2.1 The Roots of the FPGA LOGi Family – “FPGA-Mark1”    

2.2 FPGA LOGi Family Overview    

2.2.1 LOGi Family Key Attributes    

2.2.2 Plug-and-Play Interfacing with the Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone and Arduino DUE    

2.2.3 Plug-and-Play with a multitude of existing hardware peripheral modules using PMODS - Arduino Shields    

2.2.4 LOGi Family Educational Pathway    

2.2.5 LOGi Family Hardware developed to be used in a wide array of applications    

2.2.6 LOGi High performance applications in a plug and play manner    

2.2.7 LOGi FPGA Applications for non-FPGA users or for the most experienced FPGA designers    

2.2.8 LOGi Team Driver Development and Support    

2.2.9 LOGi Team Custom Hardware Designs to support LOGi Applications    

2.2.10 LOGi Team and LOGi Community of Existing Practicing Professionals    

3) What Makes the LOGi Family Boards Unique    

3.1 Features that no other existing FPGA platforms have:    

4) Prospective Distributors interest in the LOGi Family    

4.1 Why Would Direct Distributors be interested in carrying the LOGi Family    

5)  The LOGi Family boards are designed to be low cost yet highly functional    

5.1 Cost versus Performance Trade-Off of FPGA and onboard components    

5.2 FPGA Selection Considerations    

5.3 PCB Design considerations    

5.4 RAM Considerations    

6) LOGi Family Boards - Overview    

6.1 All Platforms    

6.2 LOGi-Mark1    

6.3 LOGi-Bone    

6.4 LOGi-Piduino    

7) Market Comparison – Target Price – MFG    

8) Demo of the Existing LOGi boards    

8.1 LOGi-Mark1 and LOGi-Bone Beta Prototypes and Demos    

8.2 LOGi-Mark1 and LOGi-Bone Beta Demos    

8.3 Demo’s to Show:    

References:    

 

LOGi Family Overview

The LOGi series is a family of FPGA development boards that mitigates the sharp learning curve associated with FPGA development and unifies existing hardware interfaces and platforms.  FPGA development is an invaluable technology that allows a single board to morph in functionality to fit the needs of changing environments.  The LOGi Family FPGA boards allow beginning or experienced FPGA developers a plug-and-play experience with popular embedded systems including the Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone and the Arduino DUE. The LOGi Team and the LOGi family of boards create a closed loop solution including applications and hardware for a low-cost, easy-to-use, highly-functional FPGA development solution that complements current COTS hardware peripherals and systems.

 

LOGi Family Key Attributes

  • The LOGi family provides direct plug-and-play FPGA expansion for popular embedded development platforms including the Beaglebone [6], Raspberry Pi [7] and Arduino DUE [8] allowing easy FPGA augmentation to existing embedded designs and projects.

  • The LOGi family provides direct plug-and-play interfaces to existing hardware peripherals including PMODs [2] and Arduino Shields [3].  This allows for a wide array of existing low cost hardware to be used with the LOGi development boards.

  • The LOGi family allows FPGA beginners to efficiently learn the basics of FPGA design and   migrate to current high performance FPGA applications, using the LOGi boards standalone or with existing embedded platforms.

  • The LOGi family boards each has direct FPGA device configuration options that eliminate the need to use expensive proprietary programmers.

  • LOGi Family Hardware was developed to be used in a wide array of applications including machine vision, video processing acceleration, Bitcoin mining, quad copter control, robot control and many more.

  • LOGi platforms can easily be reconfigured to support highly contrasting applications by  loading a new bitstream file and plugging in the support hardware – Allows beginners to advanced users access to FPGA capability.

  • LOGi Team Drivers support the interfaces between the Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone and Arduino DUE.

  • The LOGi Team provides support by creating applications for the LOGi boards.  Existing applications include machine vision and bitcoin mining - all Open Source – and many more are to come.

  • The LOGi Team is creating custom hardware peripheral designs to provide plug-and-play functionality with the LOGi applications.

  • The LOGi Team is a group of practicing professionals, committed to the success of the LOGi family of development boards.






 

1) Valent F(x), LLC and Michael Jones, Creator of the LOGi Family

1.1

I am Michael Jones of Valent F(x), LLC [1].  I founded Valent F(x) in 2012 to provide private electrical engineering consulting and to contribute designs and projects to the open source community.  I have worked in the electronics industry since 2004 when I received a degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Utah.  My work has focused on embedded system design, FPGA system design and wide ranges of general circuit design.  

 

1.2

I love working with electronics professionally and as a hobbyist.   I find myself merging the technology and methods used in my professional designs to create projects that are useful in the hobby realm.  Working with hobby electronics, I have found that there are some gaps that I might fill, especially in the area of FPGA design.  FPGAs are an invaluable tool for electronics design.  They can be used to supplement existing electronic platforms or be used in a standalone manner.   This combination of uses got me thinking and I came up with idea of the LOGi FPGA development board family that eases FPGA use for the everyday hobbyist and experienced engineers.

 

2) Overview of the FPGA LOGi Family Attributes and Key features

2.1 The Roots of the FPGA LOGi Family – “FPGA-Mark1”

The root of the FPGA LOGi Family was a basic FPGA development board design that preceded the LOGi-Mark1, the “FPGA-Mark1”. It was designed to ease FPGA development.  It's design focused singularly on being an MCU/FPGA development board that interfaced with widely used existing hardware interfaces including PMODs [2] and Arduino Shields [3] and was able to directly interface with Arduino platform development boards.  I took the FPGA-Mark1 to Maker-Faire-New York [4] to get feedback from potential end-users.   The FPGA-Mark1 was received very positively and won The Maker-Faire Editor’s Choice award [5].   Most of the user feedback received from Maker Faire and from other correspondences indicated a high level of interest in interfacing the FPGA-Mark1 with the Beaglebone and the Raspberry Pi.  I therefore enhanced the FPGA-MARK1 design to fully encapsulate the initial concepts of the FPGA-MARK1 and implement requests and feedback I received.  The new development board designs that grew from this effort are now known as the LOGi Family.

 

2.2 FPGA LOGi Family Overview

The LOGi series is a family of FPGA development boards that eases FPGA development and unifies existing hardware interfaces and platforms.  The way FPGAs are currently used in development has several difficulties including: requiring the use of expensive programming tools; having non-standard expansion hardware interfaces; being difficult and error prone to create wiring interfaces to existing embedded platforms; and requiring a high learning curve to become proficient with HDL programming.   The LOGi family addresses these issues and focuses on the following attributes to create a seamless and highly versatile FPGA development experience:


 

2.2.1 LOGi Family Key Attributes

  • The LOGi family provides direct plug-and-play FPGA expansion for popular embedded development platforms including the Beaglebone [6], Raspberry Pi [7] and Arduino DUE [8] allowing easy FPGA augmentation to existing embedded designs and projects.

  • The LOGi family provides direct plug-and-play interfaces to existing hardware peripherals including PMODs [2] and Arduino Shields [3].  This allows for a wide array of existing low cost hardware to be used with the LOGi development boards.

  • The LOGi Family allows FPGA beginners to efficiently learn the basics of FPGA design and   migrate to current high performance FPGA applications, using the LOGi boards standalone or with existing embedded platforms.

  • The LOGi family boards each has direct FPGA programming options that eliminate the need to use expensive proprietary programmers.

  • LOGi Family Hardware was developed to be used in a wide array of applications including machine vision, video processing acceleration, bitcoin mining, quad copter control, robot control and many more.

  • LOGi platforms can easily be reconfigured to support highly contrasting applications by  loading a new bitstream file and plugging in the support hardware – Allows beginners to advanced users access to FPGA capability.

  • LOGi Team Drivers support the interfaces between the Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone and Arduino DUE.

  • The LOGi Team provides support by creating applications for the LOGi boards.  Existing applications include machine vision and bitcoin mining - all Open Source – and many more are to come.

  • The LOGi Team is creating custom hardware peripheral designs to provide plug-and-play functionality with the LOGi applications.

  • The LOGi Team is a group of practicing professionals, committed to the success of the LOGi family of development boards.

 

2.2.2 Plug-and-Play Interfacing with the Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone and Arduino DUE

There are currently very high performance, low-cost embedded platforms on the market including the Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone and the lesser performing Arduino DUE.  These embedded solutions provide very small form factor, high performance CPU processing solutions.  The FPGA LOGi Family supports direct plug-and-play interfacing options to such embedded platforms to create a symbiotic relationship between CPU and FPGA processing paradigms.  Direct connection interfacing allows applications to be developed in a rapid, high performance, and error-free manner by removing the need for discrete wiring or soldering to create interfaces between heterogeneous embedded systems and FPGA platforms.  FPGA LOGi family solutions have been designed and prototyped to meet these needs.   The current LOGi family platforms have direct plug-and-play interfacing options for the Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone and Arduino DUE platforms.

 

2.2.3 Plug-and-Play with a multitude of existing hardware peripheral modules using PMODS - Arduino Shields

There are many plug-in hardware solutions available on the market today, many of which have their own proprietary interfacing options with proprietary standards.  Many of these development platforms have proprietary add-on peripherals that are designed to interface only with the given platform.  The LOGi Family seeks to allow as much plug-and-play expansion to existing available hardware as possible by using widely available and low-cost, off-the-shelf hardware.  PMODs and Arduino Shields were chosen to be used as a standard interface, based on their wide market usage, availability, and cost.  There are currently 59 PMODs and 281 Arduino Shields available that could be used to add direct functionality to the LOGi family boards.  Additionally, high bandwidth SATA interconnects implementing impedance controlled LVDS lines can be interfaced.  By using LVDS, such applications as HDMI, SDR, LVDS camera interfaces and other high bandwidth applications can easily be developed on the LOGi family of boards.  All applications are intended to be implemented without needing soldering, jumper wires or “perf” board expansion as is generally required to interface to many existing FPGA boards.

 

2.2.4 LOGi Family Educational Pathway

The LOGi family has an education pathway to allow FPGA beginners to easily learn the basics of FPGAs and HDL design.  The educational path walks beginners through the basic steps of FPGA design by using examples from the book “FPGA Prototyping By Verilog Examples” [9] or “FPGA Prototyping By VHDL Examples” [10].  The examples can be run by using an add-on EDU expansion module [11] that supports the book examples and applications.   Using these examples allows the user to quickly get up to speed with the basics of FPGA design and allows the user to migrate to designing and working with greater complexity applications.  There are many FPGA resources that do not give all of the information needed, or omit some of the relevant information required to fully understand the basic and advanced topics of developing FPGA designs.  The books chosen contain the crucial concepts of FPGA design in a practical and concise way that will get the reader up and running in an efficient manner.

 

2.2.5 LOGi Family Hardware developed to be used in a wide array of applications

FPGAs are widely used in the electronics industry because of their unrivaled ability to be fully reconfigured to support any number of contrasting applications while not requiring any modification to the PCB hardware or design.  In this way, FPGAs are like a chameleon, taking on new colors or disguises to adapt to changing environments.  FPGA’s can adapt to changing environments simply by loading a new bitstream file that was designed for the new use.  The LOGi Team plans on fully utilizing this attribute to allow the LOGi family of boards to be used in a maximum number of applications, by simply loading a new bitstream file to the FPGA.  If there is any required peripheral hardware for the application, the user can simply plug-in the supporting hardware to the standardized expansion ports and the application will be up and running in seconds.

 

2.2.6 LOGi High performance applications in a plug and play manner

The LOGi family was designed to allow implementation of many high performance applications in a straightforward manner. Many popular applications are best served by the processing capabilities of an FPGA, including SDR (Software defined Radio), quad-copter control, computer vision, and bitcoin mining.   The LOGi family boards are designed to support such applications by simply loading a new bitstream file and plugging-in any required supporting hardware modules.  The LOGi team [18] has created applications that implement machine vision [12]and bitcoin mining [13] and plans to develop many more.  The machine vision application uses specialized digital signal processing to implement a  sobel filter [14] that allows users to implement applications such as edge detection, line following, or environmental gradient evaluations.  The bitcoin mining applications exploits the FPGAs capability of being able to handle highly intensive iterative calculations such as those used in computing the cryptographic hash functions of  SHA-256 [15] in order to authenticate bitcoin transactions.  These applications are developed to be run on any of the LOGi family boards which can, in turn, be used on any of the supported host platforms.   The conceivable applications are in no way limited to those written by the logi-team.  As an open hardware platform, new functionality will only be constrained by the limitless vision and imagination of those who adopt the LOGi family as their platform of choice.  It is our hope to grow and support an open community around the LOGi platform(s).

 

2.2.7 LOGi FPGA Applications for non-FPGA users or for the most experienced FPGA designers

The LOGi Team applications are developed to be fully open source and allow end users to use the applications in a superficial plug-and-play manner or to delve into the open source application hardware description language (HDL) in order to improve upon, learn from, or create independent implementations.   This topology allows FPGA beginners or embedded users with little experience to implement complex applications with minimal effort by simply loading the FPGA bitstream file and running the application.  Alternatively, more experienced FPGA users can delve into the nuts and bolts of the HDL implementations to further improve, develop or learn.  This topology allows anyone to use FPGAs and their inherent capability, not just those who have the time and resources available to create their own FPGA designs.

 

2.2.8 LOGi Team Driver Development and Support

The LOGi Team is currently working on complete driver support to allow the LOGi boards to be used with the supported host platforms.  First version drivers are completed for the LOGi-Bone and consist of a custom high bandwidth GPMC and SPI interface between the FPGA and the Beaglebone.  A similar SPI interface driver is currently under development for the Raspberry Pi.  A functioning version of the SPI driver for the Pi is working, but work is being done to maximize peak bandwidth.  Further work will be to develop similar drivers for the Arduino DUE.

 

2.2.9 LOGi Team Custom Hardware Designs to support LOGi Applications

The LOGi Team has designed and will continue to design unique hardware peripherals to support the LOGi Team applications.  The Hardware will be designed in the PMOD and Arduino Shield form factor to allow the boards to be used in a plug-and-play manner with LOGi family boards.  The LOGi Team has current designs including the  EDU expansion board [11] that supports the “FPGA LOGi Family Educational Pathway” and the LOGi CMOS camera board [17] that allows an array of different CMOS cameras to be connected to the LOGi Family boards.  Future peripherals will be designed as requested and as needed to support creative projects for the LOGi Family.



 

2.2.10 LOGi Team and LOGi Community of Existing Practicing Professionals

The  LOGi Team [18] consists of FPGA and embedded specialists including: Jonathan Piat, Ting Cao, Brian Wiec, Mustafa Yuce, Andy Gikling, Eric Fort and Michael Jones.   Each of the LOGi Team members is a practicing professional in their respective field within the electronics industry.  We hope invite a community of additional contributors to support the current applications and to motivate future projects and applications.  We foresee that through team effort and with the support of a community, many cutting edge applications will be made available in a low cost and plug-and-play manner using the LOGi Family boards.

 

3) What Makes the LOGi Family Boards Unique

 

3.1 Features that no other existing FPGA platforms have:

  • The capability of plug-and-play FPGA capability with  Beaglebone, Raspberry Pi and Arduino DUE.

  • The capability of plug-and-play expansion  of a multitude of existing hardware peripherals using over 59 existing PMODs and 281 existing Arduino Shields, or standard .100” spacing on the PMOD headers for other interfaces.

  • The ability of the LOGi boards to be used in standalone FPGA applications or in conjunction with Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone or Arduino DUE.

  • The ability to use high performance LOGi Team Applications such as the machine vision, bitcoin mining, and many future applications with the Beaglebone, Raspberry Pi and Arduino DUE.

 

4) Prospective Distributors interest in the LOGi Family


 

4.1 Why Would CircuitCo/BoardZoo/BeagleBoard Toys be interested in the LOGi Family

  • Direct distribution to support the Beaglebone and newer family board versions.

  • It would be optimal to have the LOGi boards manufactured using the same high quality process as is used with the current CircuitCo products.

  • An FPGA allows many application scenarios from a single product, allowing the option for users to develop applications that are currently not supported by the cape offerings.

  • The LOGi-Bone and the LOGi-Mark1 offer expansive highly functional applications and capabilities that utilize FPGA technology.

  • The LOGi-Bone and the LOGi-Mark1 each offer complementary functionality for the Beaglebone product line.



 

4.1 Why Would Direct Distributors be interested in carrying the LOGi Family

  • Direct distribution to support the Beaglebone.

  • Direct distribution to support the Raspberry Pi.

  • Direct distribution to support the Arduino DUE.

  • An FPGA allows many application scenarios from a single product, allowing the option for users to develop applications that are currently not supported by other expansion offerings.




















 

5)  The LOGi Family boards are designed to be low cost yet highly functional

 

5.1 Cost versus Performance Trade-Off of FPGA and onboard components

Keeping the cost low while achieving high-end functionality was a high priority in the design of the LOGi Family.  FPGA package and model selections were a driving factor in the final cost of the cape design.  By selectively choosing the FPGA family and package, final design costs were minimized.

 

5.2 FPGA Selection Considerations

The FPGA chosen to be the base for LOGi family boards was a Spartan 6 device.  FPGA technology can, in general, be very expensive, especially for the cutting edge FPGA families.  The Spartan 6 family has many of the high-end features found in Virtex family devices but doesn't burden applications with the exorbitant costs of these higher-end families.  A TQFP-144 package was selected in order to minimize the PCB fabrication costs.  Use of a BGA package was avoided in order to maintain low cost constraints based upon the PCB width/space and drill-hole sizes.  The TQFP-144 package provides adequate pin-count even in applications where many pins are dedicated to the use of SDRAM or SRAM.

 

5.3 PCB Design considerations

A 4 layer PCB was designed to facilitate the FPGA and onboard hardware of the LOGi boards.  PCB specification 6 mil line width, 6 mil space width, and 13 mil minimum thru hole were used to route the PCB.  The given specification allows for minimum PCB fabrication costs.  All components were placed on the top layer to minimize costs for assembly.  The PCB was routed with signal integrity in mind.  The SRAM and SDRAM, GPMC and LVDS signals were length tuned and impedance calculations were done to ensure signal integrity parameters.  All PCBs were professionally designed using Altium Designer, which provides top quality PCB layout.

 

5.4 RAM Considerations

To enable high-end applications that require a high amount of data buffering such as video and DSP, onboard RAM was added to the design of the LOGi-Bone and the LOGi-Piduino.  Capabilities to interface with SRAM or SDRAM memory technologies were also added to the design.  A footprint for each memory technology was populated on the PCB to allow the desired memory type to be selectively populated on the PCB at assembly time.  Alternatively, the end user could replace one memory type for another based on the requirements of the application.

 

6) LOGi Family Boards - Overview

6.1 All Platforms

  • Spartan 6 LX9 FPGA offering Xilinx’s latest high performance architecture - Supports high end application including video processing, SDR, bitcoin mining, quad-copter control and many more.

  • Plug and Play with 59 available PMODs hardware peripherals and 281 available Arduino shields – functionality such as Ethernet, WIFI, ADC, DAC, USB, PS2, etc can be added by simply plugging it in.

  • High Speed SATA interface supporting 2 LVDS pairs for high bandwidth applications.

  • LOGi Team drivers developed for interfacing to host platforms.

  • LOGi Team Applications written for plug-and-play access to high end applications – just load the bitstream file and run – All Open Source – Current Projects developed for video processing and Bitcoin mining.

  • LOGi Team custom hardware peripherals to support LOGi applications for plug-and-play experience using PMOD and Arduino form factor.


 

6.2 LOGi-Mark1

  • Drag-and-Drop programming of FPGA bitstream and MCU Firmware.

  • Can be used in multiple scenarios: Standalone development board, Standalone learning platform with EDU expansion PCB, In conjunction with Raspberry Pi, Beaglebone or Arduino DUE.

  • Onboard FPGA Peripherals: 4x switch, 4x Push Buttons, FT230 UART-USB, 8x LED, 16Mbit Flash, 4x PMOD, 2x SATA, JTAG debug.

  • Onboard LPC1343 MCU Peripherals: 2x Push button, 2x LED, USB, 16Mbit Flash, 1x PMOD, 4x ADC inputs - Can be used with or without being connected to external host.

  • Onboard NXP LPC1343 ARM Cortex M3 MCU development platform.

  • NXP LPC1343 can be used as a basic co-processor to the FPGA or used with all of it’s onboard hardware including ADC, Timers, PWM, etc.






 

6.3 LOGi-Bone   

  • Plug-and-Play compatible with the Beaglebone – No soldering or wire jumpering necessary.

  • SRAM or SDRAM onboard to support high performance applications.

  • FPGA bitstream files programmable from the Beaglebone.

  • Basic onboard peripherals: 2x push button, 2x LED, EEPROM, 16Mb Flash, JTAG interface, 2x PMOD, 1xArduino Header.







 

6.4 LOGi-Piduino

  • Plug and Play compatible with the Raspberry Pi and Arduino DUE – No soldering or wire jumpering necessary.

  • SRAM or SDRAM onboard to support high performance applications.

  • FPGA bitstream files programmable from the Raspberry Pi and Arduino DUE.

  • Basic onboard peripherals: 2x push button, 2x LED, EEPROM, 16Mb Flash, JTAG interface, 4x PMOD, 1xArduino Header.






























 

7) Market Comparison – Target Price – MFG

 

7.1 Valent F(x) will consider contracting the manufacture of the boards or having the distributors manufacture and distribute the boards.  Figure 1 illustrates comparable FPGA development boards and shows functionality associated with the boards.  The Green highlights show exceeding strong points for the LOGi family of boards.  A tentative and starting price point was concluded based on this information.  Initial BOM and assembly costs with a markup factor of 2.3x indicate that these price points may be reasonable, but the price points can be adjusted accordingly to meet the final needs of specific distributors.

Figure 1- LOGi Family Market Survey and Comparison















 

8) Demo of the Existing LOGi boards

 

8.1 LOGi-Mark1 and LOGi-Bone Beta Prototypes and Demos

Full prototypes of the LOGi-Mark1 and LOGi-Bone Slim have been fabricated and firmware drivers and development are under way to allow for a turn-key solution for distributors to carry the family.  The LOGi-Piduino has been designed and final design will occur after full prototyping and beta testing of the LOGi-Mark1 and LOGi-Bone.

 

8.2 LOGi-Mark1 and LOGi-Bone Beta Demos

LOGi Demos that showcase the capability of the LOGi family of boards are being developed concurrently with the firmware and driver development. Demos have been developed that showcase a machine vision application and a bitcoin mining rig.  The demos were initially developed to run on the LOGi-Bone and the Beaglebone, but development is under way to port the demos to run on the LOGi-Mark1 and the Raspberry Pi as well.

 

8.3 Demo’s to Show:

  • LOGi-Mark1 Beaglebone/Raspberry Pi

    • Image processing showing the Sobel Filter streaming for LOGi Camera module.

    • Bitcoin mining application running intensive hashing algorithms to solve bitcoin packet hash.

 

  • LOGi-Bone Slim Beaglebone

    • Image processing showing the Sobel Filter streaming for LOGi Camera module.

    • Bitcoin mining application running intensive hashing algorithms to solve bitcoin packet hash.



















 

References:

[1] Valent F(x) Home Page - http://valentfx.com/

[2]Digilent Inc. PMOD peripheral Lising - http://www.digilentinc.com/Products/Catalog.cfm?NavPath=2,401&Cat=9&CFID=371140&CFTOKEN=24237716

[3] Arduino Shield Listing - http://shieldlist.org/

[4] LOGi-Mark1 at Maker Faire - http://blog.makezine.com/2012/09/25/maker-faire-new-york-fpga-mark-1/

[5] LOGi-Mark1 Editor’s choice award - http://makerfaire.com/blue-ribbon/

[6] Beaglebone Homepage - http://beagleboard.org/bone/

[7] Raspberry Pi Overview - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberry_pi

[8] Arduino DUE Homepage - http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardDue

[9] “FPGA Prototyping by Verilog Example” Reference Book - http://www.amazon.com/FPGA-Prototyping-Verilog-Examples-ebook/dp/B005PS4YCC/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1363458377&sr=8-3&keywords=fpga+prototyping+examples

[10] “FPGA Prototyping by VHDL Example” Reference Book - http://www.amazon.com/FPGA-Prototyping-VHDL-Examples-ebook/dp/B005PS4ZQW/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1363458377&sr=8-4&keywords=fpga+prototyping+examples

[11] LOGi-Mark1 EDU expansion PCB - http://valentfx.com/logi-blog/item/logi-edu-expansion-pcb

[12] LOGi Image Processing Application - http://valentfx.com/logi-blog/item/logi-guide-image-processing-sobel-filter-demo

[13] LOGi Bitcoin Mining Applications http://valentfx.com/logi-blog/item/fpga-logi-family-bitcoin-mining-application

[14] Sobel Filter Overview - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sobel_operator

[15] SHA Encryption Overview - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SHA-2

[17] LOGi CMOS Camera Expansion PCB - http://valentfx.com/logi-blog/item/logi-camera-pmod-pcb

[18] LOGi Team Members - http://valentfx.com/logi-blog/category/logi-team

 

Other:

Powerpoint presentation of the LOGi-Bone and the LOGi Family – Entry into cape contest -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhL0Dyyd0zE

Video showing Sobel Filter Video Processing Running on the LOGi-Bone -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_425812&feature=iv&src_vid=uhL0Dyyd0zE&v=hSHwD6L7dVQ

 

Contact:

For Questions or further information please contact Michael Jones at mjones@valentfx.com .

 
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